We are independent & ad-supported. We may earn a commission for purchases made through our links.

Advertiser Disclosure

Our website is an independent, advertising-supported platform. We provide our content free of charge to our readers, and to keep it that way, we rely on revenue generated through advertisements and affiliate partnerships. This means that when you click on certain links on our site and make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn more.

How We Make Money

We sustain our operations through affiliate commissions and advertising. If you click on an affiliate link and make a purchase, we may receive a commission from the merchant at no additional cost to you. We also display advertisements on our website, which help generate revenue to support our work and keep our content free for readers. Our editorial team operates independently from our advertising and affiliate partnerships to ensure that our content remains unbiased and focused on providing you with the best information and recommendations based on thorough research and honest evaluations. To remain transparent, we’ve provided a list of our current affiliate partners here.

What Were the Confederate States of America?

Dan Cavallari
By
Updated May 17, 2024
Our promise to you
UnitedStatesNow is dedicated to creating trustworthy, high-quality content that always prioritizes transparency, integrity, and inclusivity above all else. Our ensure that our content creation and review process includes rigorous fact-checking, evidence-based, and continual updates to ensure accuracy and reliability.

Our Promise to you

Founded in 2002, our company has been a trusted resource for readers seeking informative and engaging content. Our dedication to quality remains unwavering—and will never change. We follow a strict editorial policy, ensuring that our content is authored by highly qualified professionals and edited by subject matter experts. This guarantees that everything we publish is objective, accurate, and trustworthy.

Over the years, we've refined our approach to cover a wide range of topics, providing readers with reliable and practical advice to enhance their knowledge and skills. That's why millions of readers turn to us each year. Join us in celebrating the joy of learning, guided by standards you can trust.

Editorial Standards

At UnitedStatesNow, we are committed to creating content that you can trust. Our editorial process is designed to ensure that every piece of content we publish is accurate, reliable, and informative.

Our team of experienced writers and editors follows a strict set of guidelines to ensure the highest quality content. We conduct thorough research, fact-check all information, and rely on credible sources to back up our claims. Our content is reviewed by subject matter experts to ensure accuracy and clarity.

We believe in transparency and maintain editorial independence from our advertisers. Our team does not receive direct compensation from advertisers, allowing us to create unbiased content that prioritizes your interests.

During the American Civil War, several states seceded from the United States of America (the "Union") to form the Confederate States of America. Also known as the Confederate States or Confederacy, it was made up of southern states and territories that had set up a de facto government led by Confederate President Jefferson Davis. In all, 11 southern states seceded from the Union, and the Confederacy lasted the duration of the Civil War, from 1861 to 1865.

While there were many causes for the rift between the Union and the Confederacy, the primary cause was the disagreement between the two governments over the issue of slavery. The southern states wanted to continue allowing the practice, while the northern states did not. Other issues, such as states' rights and taxes and tariffs, were also major sources of tension, however. As the relationship between the Northern and the Southern states grew more and more difficult, seven Southern states decided to separate from the Union. This occurred before Abraham Lincoln took office, but four more seceded after his tenure began.

The Confederate States of America officially folded when the Confederate Army surrendered in April 1865. Until that time, however, a battle raged between the Union and Confederate armies because the Union — or what was left of the United States of America — did not recognize the Confederacy as an independent nation. President Abraham Lincoln led the Union cause, and for the duration of his presidency, the two sides struggled — as President Lincoln put it — as a nation divided.

After the Civil War ended and the Confederate States of America was abolished, the states that attempted to secede were granted representation once again in Congress in an effort to bring the country together. Freed slaves who fought for the Union, known as Freedmen, were temporarily granted the right to vote, but their civil rights struggle would continue over the course of the next century.

UnitedStatesNow is dedicated to providing accurate and trustworthy information. We carefully select reputable sources and employ a rigorous fact-checking process to maintain the highest standards. To learn more about our commitment to accuracy, read our editorial process.
Dan Cavallari
By Dan Cavallari , Former Writer
Dan Cavallari, a talented writer, editor, and project manager, crafts high-quality, engaging, and informative content for various outlets and brands. With a degree in English and certifications in project management, he brings his passion for storytelling and project management expertise to his work, launching and growing successful media projects. His ability to understand and communicate complex topics effectively makes him a valuable asset to any content creation team.

Discussion Comments

By clippers — On Oct 14, 2012

There is a great movie called CSA that imagines what America would be like in the present if the south had won the Civil War. It is funny, and prescient.

I am also a big fan of this kind of historical revisionism. It is so interesting to think about what the present and future would be like if the past had been different.

By disciples — On Oct 14, 2012

How do you guys feel about flying or displaying the Confederate flag, more commonly called the rebel flag? I know some people who think it is historical artifact with an abstract meaning that can be interpreted in many ways. I know others who see it as a symbol of racism.

I am kind of on the fence. I wouldn't own or display one myself, but I have a hard time judging people who do. How do you guys feel?

By TrogJoe19 — On Jan 14, 2011

The Confederacy was considered a worthy investment in Europe due to its large production of cotton. This investment was a great monetary gain, but a crime against humanity, since it was made large on the backs of slaves stolen from Africa.

By FitzMaurice — On Jan 13, 2011

@JavaGhoul

I would disagree that the south was in the wrong, you might as well say America was in the wrong when it split from Britain. The North was flaunting its power, and the US originally recognized states rights to self-governance. Although slavery was an atrocity, it does not excuse the north from its crimes of infringement.

By JavaGhoul — On Jan 10, 2011

In many ways, the war was all a matter of perspective, like any war. People held strong beliefs because the people they knew all believed those things. There was injustice on both sides, and good and bad guys in both the Union and the Confederacy. Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson were wonderful leaders of immense integrity. Nevertheless it is clear that the southern states were in the wrong, deciding to be openly rebellious to the government and keep slaves.

By anon60712 — On Jan 15, 2010

This article rocks! --Lisa

Dan Cavallari

Dan Cavallari

Former Writer

Dan Cavallari, a talented writer, editor, and project manager, crafts high-quality, engaging, and informative content for various outlets and brands. With a degree in English and certifications in project management, he brings his passion for storytelling and project management expertise to his work, launching and growing successful media projects. His ability to understand and communicate complex topics effectively makes him a valuable asset to any content creation team.
UnitedStatesNow, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.

UnitedStatesNow, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.